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On September 21, at the behest of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and Congressman Elihu Washburne, Logan turned the XV Corps command over to Maj. Gen. Osterhaus and returned to Illinois to stump for Lincoln. His former enemies now praised his efforts to preserve the Union, but Logan excoriated all those who criticized the war as treasonous secessionists, saying, “I will act with no party who is not in favor of my country and must refuse to support the nominees of the Chicago convention [the George B. McClellan platform].”

On September 21, at the behest of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and Congressman Elihu Washburne, Logan turned the XV Corps command over to Maj. Gen. Osterhaus and returned to Illinois to stump for Lincoln. His former enemies now praised his efforts to preserve the Union, but Logan excoriated all those who criticized the war as treasonous secessionists, saying, “I will act with no party who is not in favor of my country and must refuse to support the nominees of the Chicago convention [the George B. McClellan platform].”

When Pemberton sent a flag of truce on July 3, Grant asked Logan to lead the Union troops into the city, naming him temporary commander. Logan appointed a com­mittee to distribute provisions and rebuild the city. He then received a furlough. During his convalescence at home he spoke out supporting the war, claiming the conflict could end within 90 days if the North stood united.

The Battle of Raymond would be fought entirely by Logan’s division. Confederate Brig. Gen. John Gregg, eager to strike a blow at the advancing Union column, struck on May 12 along Fourteen Mile Creek, unaware that he was facing Logan’s 3rd Division, with the entire XVII Corps nearby. Gregg’s attack initially seemed successful, but Logan—whose horse had just been shot from under him—exhorted his men, “For God’s sake men, don’t disgrace your country.” He launched a flank attack, forcing Gregg to retreat. The Rebel general lost 100 killed, 305 wounded and 415 captured, compared to Logan’s 68 killed, 341 wounded and 37 missing.

Logan telegraphed Grant on December 17, requesting permission to return to the XV Corps. His corps would partici­pate in Sherman’s March through the Carolinas, reaching Columbia on February 2. General Joseph Johnston’s amalgamated Confederate army started a fight at Bentonville on March 19. The Union army forced Johnston to retreat, after which Sherman turned north and was preparing to enter Virginia on April 5 when news came of Richmond’s capture. Lee surrendered to Grant on April 9, and Johnston soon followed suit, surrendering to Sherman on April 26.


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