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The “don’t passline” bet is simply the reverse of passline bet, so that these bets gamble against the dice. Some Craps players refer to don’t passline bets as “betting wrong,” and consequently, a passline bet is called “betting right.” When you make a passline bet, you are betting to roll a 7 or 11 on the first roll, which would result in a win on that bet. But when you make a don’t passline bet, you are betting to roll a 2, 3, or 12. If it is a come out roll, a winning don’t passline bet will double your wager. If any other number is rolled, it will serve as the point, but this time, you hope that the point will not be rolled again before a 7. If a 7 is rolled, the don’t passline bets win.

The “don’t passline” bet is simply the reverse of passline bet, so that these bets gamble against the dice. Some Craps players refer to don’t passline bets as “betting wrong,” and consequently, a passline bet is called “betting right.” When you make a passline bet, you are betting to roll a 7 or 11 on the first roll, which would result in a win on that bet. But when you make a don’t passline bet, you are betting to roll a 2, 3, or 12. If it is a come out roll, a winning don’t passline bet will double your wager. If any other number is rolled, it will serve as the point, but this time, you hope that the point will not be rolled again before a 7. If a 7 is rolled, the don’t passline bets win.

Other Craps bets that you will encounter at the live and online Craps tables include field bets, hardways bets, proposition bets, big 8 bets, big 6 bets, and dozens of others. The easiest bets for beginners include the passline and don’t passline bets. Advanced players are able to also incorporate a variety of other bets for a more comprehensive Craps betting strategy.

Craps history, like many age-old casino games, is comprised of several theories on where the game originated, making it a bit hard to decipher the exact origin of the game. The game of Craps likely developed over time and involves a little bit of all these widely believed theories. Some theories suggest the game is based on the Old English game called Hazard and a French game called Crabes. Bernard Xavier Phillipe, a Louisiana gambler and politician, introduced the game to New Orleans, Louisiana around the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries. There was however a problem with this version of the game in that it was easily manipulated so that players could use fixed dice to cheat and push the odds in their favor. In 1907, John H. Winn created an updated version of the dice game that included a “don’t pass bet” area, making the game more akin to Craps as we know it today, and also eliminating the fixed dice problem.

A passline bet is an even money bet. This means that the amount you bet is the amount you stand to win. The player rolling the dice is referred to as “the shooter.” Prior to the shooter rolling his “come out roll” (first roll), the other players in the game are given the opportunity to make a passline bet on the shooter’s come out roll. For these other players to win these passline bets, the shooter’s come out roll must reveal a 7 or an 11 (these rolls are referred to at the Craps table as a “natural”); a natural automatically doubles the passline bet value(s) of the other players.


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